Addie’s Apples II

About a year ago, I shared a couple of Adelaide Hunter Hoodless’ apple recipes with you. Click on this link if you’d like to re-read that post.

This year, I want to share with you (read: brag about) my recent triumph in the pie-making department. One of the members of the Women Inspiring Women WI is a prize-winning pastry maker. Elaine Tully will hold a couple of workshops later this fall for our WI, but first she wanted to have a technical rehearsal at the church kitchen. There I made my first ever peach pie. OH. EM. GEE. as they say. It was wonderful good!

Just peachy!

Just peachy!

Yesterday, I made an apple pie using Addie’s Apples. Literally. These apples were picked from the trees at the Homestead.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I don’t know the variety of apple, but the flesh is crisp and tart. It held up well in the baking. I’m going to pick more this week and make applesauce.

Addie's Apples before...

Addie’s Apples before…

... and after.

… and after.

My hubby tried an apple fresh and found them rather tart. When I told him that I had made a pie he asked, “Did you put in lots of sugar?” Of course, I did, we’re talking brown sugar here!

The secret to success? Cold ingredients and limit handling: keys to fantastic pie crust. I used the pie crust recipe on the Crisco box and Edna Staebler’s Double Crust Apple Pie filling, copied here:

  • 3 cups of peeled, cored, and sliced apples (I used 4 cups. Next time I will use more – the crust to fruit ratio can use some tweaking)

Toss the apples in with the following:

  • 2/3 to 1 cup sugar, depending on tartness of apples
  • 2 tablespoons flour
  • 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg (I omitted this – too lazy to grate the nutmeg)
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt

Place in pie shell and dot with

  • 2 or 3 tablespoons of butter
  • 2 tablespoons of milk or cream

Cover with the top crust, flute edges, and slash the top to create vents for steam to escape.

Bake at 375 degrees for 40 to 45 minutes until the crusts are a pale golden colour.

***

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About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

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P.E.I. WI recipe for success: Beet Cake

 

After months of work, Helen Dawson, argricultural convener, left, and Miriam Lank, home economics and health convener, and show the results of their project – the Women’s Institute Island Product Cooking Contest Cookbook.

After months of work, Helen Dawson, agricultural convener, left, and Miriam Lank, home economics and health convener, and show the results of their project – the Women’s Institute Island Product Cooking Contest Cookbook.

If you have a surplus of beets in your garden, you might want to consider this prize-winning recipe. It was awarded “Best of” The Women’s Institute Island Product Cooking Contest Cookbook.  Copies are available at the WI office, 40 Enman Cres., Charlottetown, or by calling 902-368-4860.

Winning recipe: Beet Cake from the June 19th article in The Guardian, by Sally Cole.

3 egg yolks
1 ½ cup white sugar
1 cup oil
1 tsp. vanilla
3 tbsp. hot water
1 cup shredded carrots
1 cup shredded raw beets
½ cup raisins or nuts
2 cups flour
2 tsp. baking powder
½ tsp. salt

Mix egg yolks, sugar, oil, vanilla and hot water together. Add shredded carrots, shredded beets, raisins, flower, baking powder and salt. Fold in stiffly beaten egg whites. Pour in tube pan. Bake at 350 degrees C for one hour.

Icing

¼ cup margarine
4 oz. cream cheese
1 tsp. vanilla
1 cup icing sugar

Blend together in a bowl.

If you have a super surplus, give this recipe for Chocolate Beet Cupcakes a try, too!

***

Find us on Facebook or Twitter.

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

 

Adelaide’s Cookies

By special request! Visitors to the homestead today asked for Addie’s cookie recipe. I am happy to oblige, but must warm you: the recipe does not indicate an oven temperature. Compared to other recipes, I’d say about 350 degrees. But watch the first batch to make sure the oven is not too hot.

Cookies (plain).

1/2 cup butter.
1/4 cup milk.
2 even tsps. baking powder.
1 cup sugar.
1 egg.
Flour to roll out thin. (at least two cups)

Cream the butter, add the sugar, milk, egg beaten lightly, and the baking powder mixed with two cups of flour, then enough more flour to roll out. Roll a little at a time. Cut out. Bake about 10 minutes.

Reprinted with permission from

PUBLIC SCHOOL DOMESTIC SCIENCE

BY

MRS. J. HOODLESS,

President School of Domestic Science, Hamilton.
This Book may be used as a Text-Book in any High or Public School, if so ordered by
a resolution of the Trustees.
TORONTO:
THE COPP, CLARK COMPANY, LIMITED,
1898.
Entered according to Act of the Parliament of Canada, in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-eight, by The Copp, Clark Company, Limited, Toronto, Ontario, in the Office of the Minister of Agriculture.

***

Find us on Facebook or Twitter.

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

WI CENTENARY CAKE

Here is a cake recipe found on the UK Facebook Page – the “Unofficial” site. A social media site very much worth a look if you’d like to watch and learn from over 220,000 inspiring women.

Her Majesty  cuts the cake.

Her Majesty cuts the cake.

WI CENTENARY CAKE

As published in WI Life, Good Food Magazine and WI Cookbook

Ingredients:
225g (8oz) butter, slightly softened
225g (8oz) soft dark brown sugar
4 large free-range eggs
175g (6oz) plain flour55g (2oz) self-raising flour
80g (3oz) ground almonds
80g (3oz) glace cherries, cut into quarters
400g (14oz) currants, small pinhead
170g (6oz) sultanas
55g (2oz) mixed cut peel
½ tbsp marmalade
A wineglass of rum

Method:
1. Line a 20cm square tin with a double layer of non-stick baking parchment
2. Make a collar of folded newspaper for the outside of the tin, plus a thick piece of newspaper for the cake to sit on
3. Cream the butter and sugar until light and fluffy
4. Beat in the eggs, then stir in the flours and ground almonds
5. Fold in the fruits, followed by the marmalade and the rum. Make sure all ingredients are well mixed
6. Transfer to cake tin and smooth the top
7. Bake the cake at 160°C /fan oven 140°C gas mark 3
8. Turn down the heat after ½ – ¾ hour to 150°C/fan oven 130°C/gas mark 2 and bake until cooked – anywhere between 2-3 ½ hours
9. Use your common sense and turn down the oven as necessary if the cake is getting too brown

Anne Harrison, SWNS WI

Anne Harrison, SWNS WI

Patricia Tulip, one of the cake bakers.

Patricia Tulip, one of the cake bakers.

The cakes’ creation has been a military exercise for retired home economics teachers, Anne Harrison, 72, a dairy farmer’s wife from Wensleydale, North Yorkshire, and Pat Tulip, 75, from Bilton, Northumberland.

They spent 11 full days last month baking 44 12 x 12in cakes 3.5in deep between them. Divided up, this provides enough cake for the 5,000 members.

Miss Tulip said: ‘We’ve been very careful with costing. We used cheap flour and bought eggs in bulk. If we hadn’t had some donations, it would have cost about £1,100.’

The pair followed a recipe chosen following a competition for the WI’s 200,000-plus members won by Julie Clarke, 66, from Coverdale, North Yorkshire, who is chairman of the WI’s North Yorks West Federation.

As you can imagine, an undertaking of this magnitude was not without headaches. You can read more about that here, from the Daily Mail.

***

Find us on Facebook or Twitter.

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

Spring in Saskatchewan

SWI logoThe Spring 2015 Newsletter of the Saskatchewan WI landed in my inbox last week. Click SWI0415 for a PDF copy.

President Lynn Ballhorn writes:

Greetings Ladies
The sun is out and I think spring has finally arrived. Winter seemed to last forever. I’m on the mend from knee surgery and doing okay.
The executive have been busy getting organized and ready for the Rally-Annual Meeting on May 22. Hope you can attend. It will be held at the Western Development Museum on Highway 16A West, in Yorkton.
The agenda is on the last page of this newsletter. Please call Lynn at 306 782 3570 or e-mail wlballhorn@sasktel.net if you are coming.
The scholarship is available, please e-mail Karen if you need an application form.
We are in need of a Vice President, as my term is up and Marian is moving up to be President.
Hope everyone is in good health and has survived the winter. Looking forward to seeing you at the meeting.
All my best, Lynn

The newsletter is full of information and lots of anecdotes that will bring a smile. Here’s a sample:

Biology exam

A newsletter wouldn’t be complete without a recipe. Here’s this season’s contribution:Cinnamon_Roll_Cake-2

Cinnamon Bun Cake

Base
3 cups flour
¼ tsp. salt
1 cup sugar
4 Tsp. Baking powder
1 ½ C milk.
2 eggs
2 tsp. vanilla
½ C melted butter (I used marge.)

Mix these ingredients all together adding the butter/marg. last.
Pour into a 9 X 13 pan

Topping

1 C softened butter
1 cup Brown sugar
2 Tbsp. flour
1 Tsp. cinnamon

Mix together, drop by spoonful on base as evenly as possible. Swirl into base with a knife (as for a marble cake)

Bake at 350 for 25-30 minutes. Glaze while still warm

Glaze

2 C powdered sugar
5 Tbsp. milk
1 tsp. vanilla

It seems like a lot of work but it really tasted good and my curling friends loved it!

***

Find us on Facebook or Twitter.

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

Women’s Institute launches a wonderful cookbook!

News from Cherry Valley Ontario – what a fabulous name. I must visit!

The Athol Recreation Centre

photo

What a lovely cookbook the Cherry Valley’s Women’s Institute has put together!

 A wonderful mother’s day gift!  Why not cook something for your mother from this book this Mother’s day, while supporting all the wonderful things these ladies do for our community.

  Would also make a lovely hostess gift or a welcome gift to a new family that has moved into the community. 

$12copy

To purchase your copy contact:

Lynda Westervelt 613-476-7644  

or

Wilma de Wolde 613-471-1476    email: thepark@reach.net

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Take 10 Recipes: Hobo Stew

Ann Mandziuk, FWIC Executive officer, Manitoba writes:

March – we know spring is just around the corner but what can we do about those winter blahs? Challenge yourself to do something different this month. Pick an activity and as a family do it. It could be outdoors, at a community facility or in your own home – just pick something to break up the winter ‘blah’ time. If the weather will co-operate go outdoors and skate, toboggan, walk, or make a snowman. Start a bonfire and cook something outdoors – savour the flavour of the food. What about a games night – no TV/video games, just play board or other games with friends or family. Imagine how some of these ideas can help to grow a healthier you.

WI Recipe: Hobo Stew (Campfire Stew)

  • Ground beef or stew meat cut into small pieces
  • Vegetables of your choosing – corn, green beans, carrots, onions, bell peppers
  • Garlic or onion
  • Butter
  • Salt and pepper, to taste, or other herbs/spices

Preparation
Tear off a piece of heavy aluminum foil large enough to fold into a pocket to put your ingredients into.
Spray the foil with cooking spray. Add meat first, then vegetables. Top with seasonings and then butter. Close foil on all sides, leaving some room for steam to build. Be sure to mark your packet so it doesn’t get mixed up with anyone else’s.
Put packet into the coals. Cooking time depends on how hot your fire is. I recommend checking in about 10 minutes.

Click on the image for the source and more pictures of how to make Hobo Stew

Click on the image for the source and more pictures of how to make Hobo Stew

***

Find us on Facebook or Twitter.

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.