Adelaide Hunter Hoodless

hoodless_portrait

Adelaide was born on February 27, 1857 and raised on this isolated farm in Canada West.

Her public life began after she became a wife and mother. It was instigated by a tragic event: her fourth child died of what was then called a ‘stomach complaint’. Seemingly blaming herself for this tragedy, Adelaide’s campaign sought to raise the level of education for girls and to put supports in place for women so that they might safeguard their families.

She is credited as a co-founder of the Women’s Institute, the Young Women’s Christian Association (YWCA), the National Council of Women and the Victorian Order of Nurses (VON), and a major force behind the formation of three faculties of Household Science. She achieved national recognition in her twenty years of public life. She died in 1910, the year Laurier stated, “The twentieth century belongs to Canada.” Her work had ensured that Laurier’s words applied to women and families.

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6 thoughts on “Adelaide Hunter Hoodless

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